Homeschooling: The Beginning Of An Ending

I can’t believe I wrote this post eight years ago. Today arrived much faster than I anticipated: Kayla’s first day of her senior year, and my first day of my last year of homeschooling.

Does that mean it’s my senior year, too? Because it kinda feels that way.

Just look at this cute little second grader working on her “months of the year” with those Saxon Math worksheets.And learning keyboarding skills years ago on that ancient computer in our dining room…
…to working Algebra II problems at the kitchen table. Today, I’m remembering all the highlights of this homeschool journey…The days and hours at home to nurture and learn with my kiddos.

The big breakfasts, lunches at the picnic table or by the fireplace, and snacks at 10am and 3pm.

The read-alouds on the couch every afternoon, where I was either fighting off sleep from exhaustion or tears over The Bronze Bow.

Pregnant frog dissections

The family prayers around the table after “Bible Time.”

The wonderful friends we all made – me with an increasing number of truly incredible women, and my kids with sweet playmates-turned-confidantes and sisters in Christ through the years.

The education I received from educating my own kids.

Protocol Nights..Boston Dinner and Dancing Cruises

The thrill of seeing a child learn to read and write, and being used by God to teach them those basics.

The stages of maturity we celebrated.

The field trips to museums, symphonies, farms, big cities, re-enactments, mountains, theaters, and ponds.

The first day of school special breakfasts (cookies? pie? ice cream?) and new supplies.

The liberty to learn through a biblical worldview, and to consider other worldviews against it.

The swapping of kids from house to house for school with friends.

The sick days and snow days – on which someone was always doing school.

Tuesday “class” days with peers

 

The freedom.

The flexibility.

The fun.

Several years ago, I was tutoring a high school seminar on economics (in Classical Conversations Challenge I) and we learned about “cost-benefit” analysis. I couldn’t help but think about our choice to homeschool in those terms. The costs are pretty high in choosing the homeschool route (and I’m not just talking about living on one income and buying textbooks), but I believe the benefits outweigh those costs, and I would do it again.

I don’t regret any of the last 17 years of this homeschool journey. (My kids might regret a few!) Oh, I have a lot of moments that I regret, mostly having to do with my own impatience, but today I’m thanking God for the years and for His sustaining grace throughout.

Thanking Him, also, for the blessing of all these highlights…or benefits.

One more year. One last kid.

Senior year, here we come!